Conferences & Workshops, 2014
Inflation MA meeting
April 3, 2014 | 9:00 AM | LASR conference room
Adgenda:
  • Quick Overview [John Carlstrom and Scott Dodelson]
  • Primordial Non-Gaussianity [Marilena LoVerde]
  • Theoretical Drivers/Milestones [Wayne Hu and Scott Dodelson]
  • B-Mode and/or other experiments [John Carlstrom and Abby Vieregg]
  • Ideas for implementing within KICP/PFC [John Carlstrom and Scott Dodelson]

Workshop on CosmoSIS
May 15 - 16, 2014 | ACC 211
Organizers: Sarah Bridle, Scott Dodelson, Douglas Rudd, Elise Jennings, Alessandro Manzotti, Joe Zuntz.

We are delighted that this meeting brings together such an enthusiastic group of scientists, and as a result we want to keep scheduled talks to a minimum, so we can all learn by doing, and so we can all shape the agenda according to the interests of the participants.

The talks on the first morning will be a brief overview of the system, and in the afternoon we propose to quickly move to active coding sessions with the past-cosmosis developers in the room (we hope by the end of the meeting all the participants will be cosmosis developers!).
The second morning will be in "unconference" format, where participants propose topics for small group discussion/talks/working, in real time.
Finally we would like to finish the workshop by bringing together some of the work that was started and making a plan for how to keep helping each other to get more out of cosmosis.
So do bring along your ideas for tools you would like to use, we're hoping you'll find cosmosis useful for writing your next (or current!) paper.

AGENDA
May 15, Thursday
9:00 Welcome - Josh Frieman
9:05 Talk: Overview and vision for CosmoSIS - Scott Dodelson
9:15 Hands-on: Installation of CosmoSIS, running the demos
10:00 Talk: Under the hood - Marc Paterno
10:10 Discussion
10:15 Coffee
10:45 Talk: How to add a new module: Worked example using CFHTLenS data - Joe Zuntz
10:55 Talk: How to add a new module: How to talk to the rest of CosmoSIS - Doug Rudd
11:05 Talk: How to add a new module: Where to put it, and how to get credit - Sarah Bridle
11:15 Discussion
11:30 Open floor: Brainstorm of new modules that could be added
11:45 Prioritisation of modules and getting into teams
12:15 Lunch
14:00 Hands-on: Writing new modules in teams
15:15 Open floor: Update on progress and sharing experiences so far
15:30 Coffee
16:00 Hands-on: Writing new modules continued
17:00 Open floor: Update on progress and goals for tomorrow
17:15 Planning for the unconference tomorrow
17:30 Close

May 16, Friday
9:00 Unconference (sessions schedule live on what people want to contribute/ hear about) (can include continuing working on modules)
10:15 Coffee
10:45 Unconference
12:00 Reality check: What can we realistically finish this afternoon?
12:30 Lunch
14:00 Hands-on: Finishing stuff
15:00 Reality check: What would we like to do going forward, after this meeting
15:30 Coffee
16:00 Hands-on: Last chance to finish stuff
17:00 Plans going forward

DES Supernova workshop
May 15 - 17, 2014 | Chicago, IL
The KICP at the University of Chicago will host a 3-day workshop dedicated to the Supernova program within the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This workshop will focus on
1) optimizing the strategy for the 2nd season (starting Fall 2014),
2) spectroscopic follow-up strategy, and
3) data analysis.

High-Energy Messengers: Connecting the Non-Thermal Extragalactic Backgrounds
June 9 - 11, 2014 | Chicago, IL
Webpage

Photo Gallery
The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics (KICP) at the University of Chicago is hosting a workshop this summer on the origin of the non-thermal extragalactic backgrounds. The goal is to bring together observers and theorists representing all the high-energy wavebands and particles: radio, GeV and TeV gamma rays, and extragalactic cosmic rays and neutrinos. Topics will include isotropic diffuse intensity measurements, resolved extragalactic source populations and their collective contributions below the individual source detection threshold, anisotropies, and propagation effects and secondary cascades.

Example focus questions:
* Is there a coherent scenario which explains all the current observations in terms of established extragalactic source populations?
* What are the next steps (experimental + theoretical) to move past current uncertainties/degeneracies?

We are planning a three-day workshop for about fifty participants convening on the campus of the University of Chicago. Each day will consist of plenary presentations with plenty of time for discussion in large and/or small groups.

Workshop Topics
- Radio, gamma rays, neutrinos, UHECRs
- Isotropic diffuse intensity measurements
- Resolved extragalactic source populations and their collective contributions below the individual source detection threshold
- Anisotropies
- Propagation effects and secondary cascadesLearn more >>

Status and Future of Inflationary Theory
August 22 - 24, 2014 | Chicago, IL
Webpage

The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics (KICP) at the University of Chicago is hosting a workshop this summer on inflationary theory. The goal is to gather a small group of researchers working in inflationary cosmology for several days of informal presentations and discussion relating to the status of theories of the inflationary universe. Topics of particular focus are model building, challenges for inflationary theories, connections to fundamental physics, and prospects for refining our understanding with future datasets. This meeting is a satellite conference of COSMO 2014. The meeting will be complementary to the COSMO conference in that it will be small, informal, and relatively narrow in scope.Learn more >>

COSMO-2014: International Conference on Particle Physics and Cosmology
August 25 - 29, 2014 | Chicago, IL
Webpage

Photo Gallery
The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics (KICP) at the University of Chicago will host the International Conference on Particle Physics and Cosmology (COSMO 2014) on August 25-29, 2014, held at the University of Chicago's Gleacher Center.Learn more >>

International conference: "Type Ia Supernovae: progenitors, explosions, and cosmology"
September 15 - 19, 2014 | Chicago, IL
Webpage

The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics (KICP), and the Flash Center for Computational Science at the University of Chicago will host an International conference on the observations and simulations of thermonuclear "Type Ia Supernovae: progenitors, explosions, and cosmology" on on September 15-19, 2014. The conference will be held at the University of Chicago's Kersten Physics Teaching Center (KPTC).

Conference Topics:
* Progenitors, rates, and pre-explosion physics
* Explosion mechanisms and simulations: mergers, double detonations, single degenerates, sub-chandra's, and failed explosions
* Exceptional quality data: 2011fe, STIS UV
* Thermonuclear weirdos, SNIax, the fast and the furious
* Nucleosynthetic yields from supernovae and their effect on galaxy chemical compositions
* Host galaxy <-> luminosity relationship
* Radiation transport for SNIa
* Data-driven models for SNIa lc+spec
* SNIa and cosmology ChallengesLearn more >>

2014 KICP GLPA Workshop: Swirls in the Sky the Science Behind the Headlines: BICEP2, B-modes and Observing from the South Pole
October 30, 2014 | Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
Webpage

Lindsey Bleem, Jason Henning, & Randall H. Landsberg

The goals of this workshop are to demystify the recent front page news about the detection of B-mode polarization in measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and to enable participants to craft a "science minute" presentation applicable to their home institution. A concise science overview talk will be followed by a break out session where teams will sketch out a "science minute" and then present their ideas to the other participants and the scientific experts. We will explore why the South Pole is the best place on earth for CMB observations, the different flavors of B-modes (or "swirls") encoded in the CMB's polarization, and the profound impact that these observations may have on our understanding of the Universe and inflation.Learn more >>